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Vom Monitoring zum Klimaarchiv : Sauerstoffisotope in der Paläoklimatologie

Plessen, B., Helle, G. (2017): Vom Monitoring zum Klimaarchiv: Sauerstoffisotope in der Paläoklimatologie. - System Erde, 7, 1, pp. 12—19.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.2312/GFZ.syserde.07.01.2



http://gfzpublic.gfz-potsdam.de/pubman/item/escidoc:2176902
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Authors
http://gfzpublic.gfz-potsdam.de/cone/persons/resource/birgit

Plessen ,  Birgit
Vol. 7, Issue 1 (2017), GFZ Journal 2017, System Erde : GFZ Journal, Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum;
5.2 Climate Dynamics and Landscape Evolution, 5.0 Geoarchives, Departments, GFZ Publication Database, Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum;

http://gfzpublic.gfz-potsdam.de/cone/persons/resource/ghelle

Helle ,  G.
Vol. 7, Issue 1 (2017), GFZ Journal 2017, System Erde : GFZ Journal, Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum;
5.2 Climate Dynamics and Landscape Evolution, 5.0 Geoarchives, Departments, GFZ Publication Database, Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum;

Abstract
Stable isotopes of the light elements Hydrogen (H), Carbon (C), Nitrogen (N), and Oxygen (O) are being measured in section 5.2 Climate Dynamics and Landscape Evolution at the GFZ in different terrestrial climate archives such as lake sediments, speleothems and tree rings. The stable isotope ratios of these elements reflect environmental conditions like precipitation, temperature, productivity and vegetation type. To translate isotope parameters into high-quality proxies of past climate and environmental variability, monitoring devices have been deployed which detect seasonal variations, pathways and distortions of stable isotope signals. Oxygen stable isotopes play a major role in paleoclimatology because of their broad variation and fractionation of 16O and 18O in water, carbonate and biological systems. In general, the isotopic ratios of oxygen isotopes reflect changes in atmospheric circulation systems which are important drivers for climate variability. Back through time, the variations of oxygen isotope ratios (18O/16O) in precipitation and their corresponding climate fingerprint are conserved in lake sediments, speleothems and tree rings. Oxygen isotope records from networks of these geoarchives allow local to regional assessments of past climate variability.